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Introduction Edit

The Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database is a publicly available, professionally curated, non-redundant collection of nucleotide sequences and their corresponding protein products. This database is assembled by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Unlike it's sister database GenBank, RefSeq provides only single records for each information-containing macromolecule (DNA, RNA, or protein) it contains.

About RefSeq Edit

RefSeq is a polished set of DNA or RNA sequences and their corresponding protein product or products. NCBI provides RefSeqs for a wide array of eukaryotes, bacteria, and viruses.[1] The primary features of RefSeq include:

  • non-redundancy
  • clearly linked nucleotide and protein sequences
  • up-to-date sequence data and its role in biology
  • validated data
  • consistent formatting
  • ongoing curation by NCBI staff and corroborators

For each model organism, RefSeq aims to provide separate and linked records for genomic DNA, the mRNA transcript it codes for, and the corresponding protein it produces. RefSeq is limited to known organisms for which sufficient data is accessible (more than 16,000 distinct organisms as of September 2011), [2] while GenBank includes sequences for any organism submitted (approximately 250,000 different named organisms).

Examples and Usage Edit

For example, if one aimed to search for a the reference sequence of a protein secreted by a dendritic cell, specifically, Homo sapiens follicular dendritic cell secreted protein (FDCSP), the first step would be to go to www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and to select "RefSeq" from the drop-down bar (Figure 1).

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Step 1

Next, one would type "dendritic cell" into the search bar and hit return (Figure 2).

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Step 2

This returns a slew of reference sequences complete with nucleotides sequence, organism of interest, keywords, authors of relevant papers, summary, and much more (Figure 3).

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Step 3

== References ==
  1. "Integrated Reference Sequences" National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 3, 2014.
  2. RefSeq Release 49 Statistics (Report). National Library of Medicine. 2011. Retrieved 20 September 2011.
  1. "Integrated Reference Sequences" National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 3, 2014. ncbi.gov
  2. RefSeq Release 49 Statistics (Report). National Library of Medicine. 2011. Retrieved 20 September 2011.